Wednesday, March 29, 2017

What's it all about, Chucky?...

If you are of a certain age, you remember Alfie, the 1966 movie starring Michael Caine. It had a lovely title song by Burt Bacharach and Hal David that asked, What's it all about, Alfie?..."

I've had similar questions regarding my new book, Like a Flower in the Field. The excerpt below is my answer.

Preface

There are places in your life that leave an indelible mark.
It might be the town where you grew up,
or where you settled to raise your family,
or maybe it's the locale you chose for Act Three,
caring for grandchildren, watching them grow.

The question is: do we leave a mark on the places we've been?
When we're gone, will anything remain?
There is a verse from Psalm 103 that speaks to these questions:

Man, his days are those of grass
He flourishes like a flower in the field
A wind passes by and it is no more
Its own place no longer knows it.

The stories in this collection are from the places in my life.
I've divided them into four sections:
The Dock of The Bay; The Big Tomato;
Other Places - Other Lives; and Three Hundred Sunny Days.
No need to explain. You'll know the place when you get there.

Most tales begin with a kernel of truth, some event -
large or small - to build a yarn around.
The kernels that make me want to sit at the keyboard
and hammer out a story are coming to mind less frequently.

I'd better hurry, before a wind passes by.

So...that's what it's all about. Maybe I'll take you somewhere you've never been. Or better yet, to a place that knows you well.

CWS
____

4 comments:

  1. Funny thing about indelible. When a writer writes about those places and people, the writer becomes indelible!

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  2. What a beautiful way to look at life. Heartfelt, lovely, meaningful. Can't wait to read!

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  3. Make sure you bring a copy (or a printout) of your new book to Maui!

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  4. Always can there be defining moments we remember, for we must be romantics at heart when they become pleasurable, weaving in our minds like a long lost friend. Yes, we'd "better hurry" before the winds of life change, in our field of flowers. Your friend, Ron Collins.

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